Jararaca

Creative Commons/Fernando Tatagiba

I was interested to find this encounter with a venomous South American pit viper in Arthur Conan Doyle's seminal dinosaur novel, The Lost World. As usual when writing about snakes, Doyle is vivid and convincing, if not entirely accurate. 

The place seemed to be a favorite breeding-place of the Jaracaca snake, the most venomous and aggressive in South America. Again and again these horrible creatures came writhing and springing towards us across the surface of this putrid bog, and it was only by keeping our shot-guns for ever ready that we could feel safe from them. One funnel-shaped depression in the morass, of a livid green in color from some lichen which festered in it, will always remain as a nightmare memory in my mind. It seems to have been a special nest of these vermins, and the slopes were alive with them, all writhing in our direction, for it is a peculiarity of the Jaracaca that he will always attack man at first sight. There were too many for us to shoot, so we fairly took to our heels and ran until we were exhausted. I shall always remember as we looked back how far behind we could see the heads and necks of our horrible pursuers rising and falling amid the reeds.

I hadn't read The Lost World in years. I'd forgotten how good it is. 


No comments:

Post a Comment

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...