Grice Yammers about Poe

Opening day: The Tell-Tale Heart

Thanks to the folks at the Selim Center in Minneapolis, who recently hosted me for a six-week series on the works of Edgar Allan Poe. Luckily for me, they didn't realize I'd probably have showed up to talk about Poe for free.

Break time: Students menaced by an eerie figure.

I heard all things in the heaven and in the earth. I heard many things in hell. 
--"The Tell-Tale Heart," 
by Edgar Allan Poe

















8 comments:

  1. Well, it is nice to (in a vague way) put a face with the words I have been reading. :) I would have loved to have sat in on the lectures. (Dee)

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  2. I'm with Dee. :> Congrats!

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  3. Thanks, guys. Maybe I'll post some Poe-lecture here some time.

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  4. You ever read any of Harold Schechter's historical novels about Poe? I just got done with the first one--it wasn't bad, maybe not anything I'd buy when I could borrow it from any of the four libraries I regularly visit, but a fun read.

    Also--the Selim Center? Any idea who it was named for? I ask because at least two rather notorious Ottoman rulers, Selim Yavuz (translated: Selim the Grim) and his grandson, who, despite the strictures of his religion, grew to be such an alcoholic as to gain the epithet Selim the Sot, shared the name. Both were the sort of fun, lovable types we so enjoy discussing on these boards...

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  5. I never asked, but I'm sure it was neither of those fine fellows. The place is part of a Catholic university.

    I haven't read the historical novels. Something about the idea turns me off, though I'm not sure exactly what. Maybe it's just the thought that I'd rather read Poe again than read about him. I did recently spend a few weeks with Schechter's True Crime: An American Anthology, which I recommend highly.

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    1. Schechter's Serial Killers A-Z contains the interesting nugget of information that Locusta, the notorious female Roman contract poisoner, was executed in the arena by being raped by a trained giraffe. My favorite works of his are the biographical ones on Ed Gein and Albert Fish, which read like novels.

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    2. I think I actually read the Gein and Fish books years ago. Good stuff for those who find my work too tame.

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  6. A check of the Selim Center's website reveals that it's named for its founder: Dr. Mohamed Selim, Professor of Economics at the University.

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