Giant Jackass Kills Mayor


The mayor of a Texas town was killed by his own donkey. I don't hear of many donkey attacks; the ones I do hear about are usually a matter of territorial defense, as donkeys don't like strangers in their pens. For that reason, some farmers use them as guards for llamas and other livestock. 

Territorial defense doesn't seem to be the case here, however. Authorities explained it thus:

Texas mayor killed by huge pet donkey — RT

"“They can become very aggressive, very mean, sometimes triggered by a female in heat,” said Atoscosa County Chief Deputy David Soward. “We’ll probably never know what triggered it, but it was evident that this particular donkey was involved, based on the evidence at the scene and what we saw on this donkey.”"

I've often been told that donkeys are more intelligent and less temperamental than horses. 

Update: Dee found this interesting video about a donkey guarding livestock against a cougar:



10 comments:

  1. I trust donkeys as little as I trust horses. I remember in the local press many years ago (I was about 12) there was a story about a farmer who was bitten and mauled to death by an angry donkey who was trying to mate with the farmer's female donkey. The story caught my attention because the donkey was actually "trialed", "found guilty" and "condemned to jail" as if it was a human murderer- proof that in my country the Middle Ages are not over just yet.

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  2. I suspect the primary danger with horses and donkeys lies in the same principle as applies to domestic dogs: familiarity breeds contempt, or else our ideal of a horse (especially horses!)clouds our judgment. People who would never try to take excessive liberty with a bull because the animal is "vicious" would dismiss similar behavior in a stallion as being "spirited."

    In a fantasy novel I'm working on, I chose to feature unicorns, and wanted to make them as realistic as possible (I opted for an equine unicorn rather than the more scientifically sound antilo-caprine model.) Since some of the scenes in which they figured involved violence and fighting, I did some research and quickly learned that horses do not merely hurt humans by accident--an enraged stallion, excited by a mare in heat, can maim or kill a man with his teeth alone. Donkeys and mules (I'm unsure about zebras, though it would not surprise me) are even worse in some respects, given their intelligence. A friend of mine, an expert horsewoman, reported an uneasy encounter with several mules and her dog--the animals circled the dog and were clearly preparing to attack it.

    In the end, my unicorns became animals with the hormones and strength of horses and the intelligence of chimps, which makes me grateful they exist only in my story!

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  3. There was an interesting zebra attack in Zimbabwe a couple of years ago, seemingly quite similar to this donkey attack. I've seen a number of references to zebras being less docile and more dangerous than horses.

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  4. They are indeed more dangerous, and impossible to domesticate it seems- thats what people from circuses and zoos have told me. They are smart enough to learn tricks and all but likely to go on rampage without warning. Also, apparently, Grevy's and Grant's zebras are fiercer than plain zebras.

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  5. Makes sense that they'd be pretty fierce, considering the predators they have to deal with.

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  6. I've seen footage of zebras attacking and driving off hyenas--the hyenas, once they realized the zebra was not bluffing, scattered, one being badly trampled before it got up and hobbled away--and a tourist in Kenya, I want to say, shot film of one routing a leopard. All evidence I've run across on the zebra suggests that individual ones may be tamed--or at least as much as a miserable, bad-tempered mustang can be considered tame--but as a species, they just don't take to it. They've been crossed with both horses and donkeys; it would be interesting to see how amenable to true domesticity such offspring are.

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  7. I remember reading about some hybrids kept in circuses which were "as smart as zebras but as docile as donkeys", so perhaps these hybrids are more likely to be truly domesticated, kinda like those house cat breeds with wild cat (serval, leopard cat etc) blood who are more docile and domesticable the more removed they are from the wild ancestor.

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  8. Were they trying to use them as beasts of burden? I'm wondering what the advantage would be, considering there are plenty of donkeys.

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  9. Aparently just as curiosities, and some even performed in circuses.

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  10. Interesting. I can imagine paying to see them

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