Chimpanzees Escape in Las Vegas


1 chimp dead, 1 tranquilized after Vegas escape - Wire Weird News - The Sacramento Bee:


"Two chimpanzees escaped a Las Vegas backyard and rampaged through a neighborhood Thursday, pounding on cars and jumping into at least one vehicle before police killed one primate and tranquilized the other, authorities said."

6 comments:

  1. Hearing things like this always makes me sad in a multitude of ways. First, I am no expert on animal behavior by any means, but I have worked with animals most of my life. I was raised on a farm and then with a multitude of pets. Ferrets, snakes, rats, lizards, dogs, cats, birds, fish. (If my kids could drag it home, chances are it had a place to live). The general public is so woeful un/under-educated about animals and so many of them die simply because of human stupidity. The animals were agitated, out of their normal environs and probably more frightened than anything. If the Looky-Lous had stayed inside and just let the police handle the situation, I don't think they would have killed the male. I also think if they had allowed the animal escape from the burbs to the countryside perhaps the poor guy would have not needed to be killed. I am wondering how they managed to escape their pens? And if the aggressive behaviors were provoked, or just a result of being freaked out? Exotic pets really need to be kept far away from any city. It ends in disaster so often when they are kept in populaces. (Dee)

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  2. Chimps are amazing animals, but I agree--they need to be kept far from cities. I'd go further and say they should not be kept by private citizens at all; they're extremely unlikely to be taken care of properly, and virtually all pet primates end up inflicting some kind of injury on somebody.

    Their intelligence is part of the problem. Chimps (as well as gorillas and orangutans) have sometimes escaped by figuring out how to work the latches on their cages and even by using objects in their cages as tools.

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    1. I completely agree about private citizens not keeping exotics that are large enough to prey upon humans, and this extends to wolf-hybrid dogs who are younger than 3rd or 4th generation breeding. I know some states require licensing for keeping exotic animals, but when you read some of these articles it makes you wonder just how stringent the requirements are and just how cheaply a license can be purchased. There is a need for some of these animals to be reared in captivity, because like it or not, big pharma is going to have to test medicine on something. (I still say there are some people being housed in prison who would make better guinea pigs for them, but I fear mine is not a popular opinion.)
      Completely off topic, but did you happen to read about the Ivory Bust that was in the news this morning? (Dee)

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  3. I don't know about Nevada, but the requirements vary from state to state. Ohio has recently passed tighter restrictions after the bizarre suicide/mass escape tragedy last year. Wolf-dogs are a huge problem to regulate because an owner can always claim his pet is just a dog.

    Wow, it took me a minute to figure out "bust" meant "arrest." I was imagining some interesting things. No hadn't heard about that, but I've googled it up. I'm not surprised to see the ivory trade moving this kind of merch, but it's very disheartening.

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    1. When I was in Idaho, a friend had a neighbor who bred wolf hybrids. Most of her animals were only second generation and while I love animals, those scared me. She had them in a top enclosed chain link kennel but it still "felt" flimsy to me. I have watched them trying to fight one another through the cages and have seen them throw themselves against the walls of the kennel trying to escape to get to my friend. I asked him if he ever worried that one of them would actually escape, and he told me if they did they better be able to out run bullets. But as frightening as they were, when they started howling it was a beautiful noise. The kind that makes the hair stand on the back of your neck.

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  4. Your friend's attitude about escapes is one I've seen before, and I'd say it's a big part of the problem. If people who kept wild animals for pets were only endangering themselves, it would be different. But the animals aren't likely to make their escape while somebody is standing by to handle them, and the victims are often innocent bystanders. Because of their size, children are more likely to fall victim to escaped predators than adults. And of course the animal itself is likely to suffer, both from the captivity and as a result of any violence it inflicts on people.

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