Polar Bear Breaks into Houses



No humans hurt in this incident from Newfoundland, but there were some duck-related tragedies. 


Newfoundland Polar Bear Attack: Animal Shot Dead After Attacking Homes, Livestock: "He said the bear beat in doors and broke windows at three other homes, and killed some sheep and ducks at a nearby stable without stopping to eat.


At one home, the bear "just broke the windows out of each side of the house and went on," he said. "It seemed like he was in a bad mood.""

9 comments:

  1. A real "Bad News Bear" eh? (Dee)

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  2. That's one unusual photo... we see many polar bears in barren Arctic landscapes but very few of them in forested places. :D

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  3. Apparently we'll be seeing more of them in inappropriate settings as the Arctic shrinks. A lot of big animals are said to be affected by climate change, but the polar bears are a particularly visible example.

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  4. Good to know tho that not all of them will starve or drown... although I wonder if they will start competing with grizzlies for food and territory or if they will be reabsorbed by them (you know, as they say polar bears evolved from brown bears, maybe they will start hybridizing again and eventually become re-integrated with their ancestral species? Or am I being too optimistic?)

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  5. Scientists have already confirmed one brown-polar hybrid that occurred in the wild, so I'd say re-absorption is a good possibility. I'm sure they'll fight, too, as bears don't get along well with each other even within their own species. There has been concern in recent years about polar bear boars eating too many polar bear cubs as they try to adapt to the warming environment. People were seeing a lot of that in 2009. However, some observers claim that's a natural and common phenomenon independent of climate change.

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  6. Clarification: The boars eating the cubs is definitely natural. It's the frequency of this happening that raised concerns.

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  7. But surely that would revert to normal frequency levels once polar bears moved south and adapted to new food sources?

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  8. We can hope, but it's not sure. One problem is that the polar bear is a vulnerable species, with some of its populations in decline already. Challenges that a more populous species might bounce back from become more severe under these circumstances.

    The other problem is that many polar bear behaviors are specifically keyed to ice. The sows protect their cubs from the boars partly by taking them out onto ice floes. Also, adults hunt pinnipeds from ice shelves. When the ice vanishes, these behaviors don't work anymore. Unlike other bears, polars are highly carnivorous and depend on a fatty diet of pinnipeds. They can't easily adapt to a new diet because nothing carries as many calories as an animal with blubber--certainly not vegetable matter, which is what other bears usually rely on.

    I don't mean to say it's hopeless, just very serious.

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  9. True... well, only time will tell.

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